Cao Fei + Map Office at SCAD

The Savannah College of Art and Design presents “NO LAB on Tour” by renowned multimedia artist Cao Fei and Map Office co-founders Laurent Gutierrez and Valerie Portefaix. The exhibition will be on display at the ACA Gallery of SCAD, Woodruff Arts Center, 1280 Peachtree St., Dec. 14-Feb. 7. A reception will be held Jan. 14, 6 p.m. The exhibition and reception are free and open to the public.

In “NO LAB,” Chinese artist Cao Fei teams up with Hong-Kong-based Map Office to create a virtual experience of New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina in the online virtual world community, Second Life. Fei depicts the storm surge and the devastating aftermath through a stark, politically charged multimedia presentation. In the ACA Gallery, visitors can experience “NO LAB on Tour” and participate in the ongoing discussion of urban space, society and the trauma/drama of change via a variety of visual materials including line drawings, photographs, light boxes, a video and computer stations where they can access Second Life.

Adding to the experience, line drawings incorporating imagery from a “second line” parade (a tradition in brass band parades in New Orleans) that marched through Savannah Sept. 25, will be included in this evolving exhibition. The parade included a brass band, costumes and a grand procession of students, faculty, staff and community members that concluded at the Pei Ling Chan Gallery in Savannah.

Fei is one of the most important artists in the emerging international art scene today, mixing social commentary, popular aesthesis, surrealism and documentary conventions to depict the rapid and chaotic change occurring in modern day China. She continually blurs the line of fantasy and real life in her work. Fei was born in the Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, China, and earned a B.F.A. from Guangzhou Academy of Fine Arts.

Map Office is an interdisciplinary design and research platform conceived by Gutierrez and Portefaix. Their projects focus on territorial strategies of global spaces, involving a critical analysis of spatial and temporal anomalies and documentation of the ways in which human beings subvert and appropriate spaces for their own uses.

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